‘Natural Selections’ exhibition blends interpretations of science and the natural world

NEWPORT, R.I. – (Sept. 23, 2016) – The creative work of three new England-based artists who blur the boundaries between the microscopic and the macroscopic will be featured when “Natural Selections”  is on exhibit Oct. 6-Nov. 9 at The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery on the campus of Salve Regina University.
 
The public is welcome to an opening reception on Thursday, Oct. 6 from 5-8 p.m. at the Gallery, corner of Lawrence and Leyroy avenues. An artists’ talk will be presented as part of the opening reception from 6-7 p.m.
 
The exhibition of paintings, inkjet prints and sculptural ceramics, born from a fascination with science and the natural world, unites the creative work of Angela Cunningham, Maria Napolitano and Laurie Sloan. Together, their images and objects will transform the gallery into a vibrant laboratory space. 
 
Cunningham introduces the viewer to a new and enlivened species of sculptural ceramics. Her three-dimensional organic volumes are stunning mutations that swell and sprout, not unlike their counterparts in nature. From plants and animals, her forms have inherited captivating physical characteristics, unique coloration and elaborate surfaces. Angela Cunningham operates Cunningham Ceramics in Somerville, Massachusetts.
 
Napolitano’s oil paintings describe a landscape just beyond our reach. Like the artifacts of an excavated civilization, her images present a puzzle-like network of organisms, diagrams and hieroglyphs. This is a mysterious world where botanical imagery is filtered through the lens of scientific illustration and mid-twentieth century abstract painting. Maria Napolitano lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.
 
In Sloan’s invented world, images evolve from file fragments into dynamic composites on a computer screen.  Her specimens are an encyclopedic assortment of pictographs that she meticulously shapes and reshapes with design software. Through a hybridization of form and process that mines the sciences, both her inkjet and screen prints explore the possibilities for image growth and visual innovation. Laurie Sloan is an Associate Professor in Printmaking at the University of Connecticut. 
 
The Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery is handicap accessible with parking along Lawrence and Leroy avenues. Its exhibits are open to the public Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesdays and Fridays 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. The gallery is closed on Mondays.